Going vegan one day a week is good for your health & your wallet

Taking one day out of the week to practice a meatless diet is more about you’ll be can adding to your diet rather than what you take away. Generally households choose meat as the main dish of their meals. Switching to a plant based diet once a week is an opportunity to fill your plate with more vegetables, more grains, and legumes that provide nutritional value that your body may not always receive from meats like fiber, potassium and vitamin B6. You can also find solace in the idea that by going meat free just one day a week could help protect the environment and may contribute to decreasing greenhouse gas emissions.

How it helps your health

Subtracting meat from your diet is less about what you’re taking away, and more about what you can add to your meals. More vegetables, fruit, and grains protects your body against heart disease and stroke. A meatless diet for just a few days a week will encourage you to consume more plant-based sources for protein. A higher intake of beans and peas leads to more fiber, protein, zinc, and iron among other helpful resources. Plant-based diets play a huge part in curbing obesity because a higher intake of vegetables and beans lowers the intake of saturated and total fat. If you’re trying to healthily lose weight, fight diabetes or cardiovascular issues – go meatless for one day a week. Your brain, heart, and body will thank you!

How it helps your wallet

Meat tends to be more expensive that fresh produce and meatless food. Creating a meal on a budget is less challenging when your meals are built around veggies, grains, and beans — instead of meat. Do this and help conserve money for more fruits and creative dessert ideas.

How it helps the environment

The water and resources livestock need to sustain is obviously greater than your vegetables and grains. Americans eat almost four times the amount of meat than any other nation of people on the globe. A plant-based diet could reduce the water consumption by animal livestock — your part of that at least! Meat production produces more of all three contributing sources of greenhouse gas. When you push for a vegetarian diet, even if just for a day, you’re doing your part in decreasing the amount of greenhouse gas released into our environment.

More: A hearty, meatless mushroom & chickpea soup recipe


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